Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Dion Sans by MartinSilvertant Dion Sans by MartinSilvertant
Dion (Sans)
____________________________________

Production information:

Program(s): Illustrator CS3, Fontlab Studio 5
Year: 2010
____________________________________

A typeface suitable for comics, cartoons and possibly many other applications. It's also a nice alternative to the too common Comic Sans.

Dion features extensive language support and 23 ligatures.

Dion is available for FREE! Click the download button to download the otf and ttf font files. If you want to use the OpenType features you should use the otf file.

If you use Dion for printed media, I would love to see a photo!
____________________________________

This typeface was used extensively for a Dutch national educational campaign called "Zonder Cash ben je nergens" ("You're nowhere without cash"). Princess Maxima officially opened the campaign. It was quite an honor to contribute.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconcsrpazzi:
csrpazzi Featured By Owner May 25, 2015
cool.
Thanks
Reply
:iconneedtakehave:
needtakehave Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2013
yu
Reply
:iconynne-black:
ynne-black Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Student General Artist
Language support? What about Czech? (our letters like ě š č ř ž) :)
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2013  Professional General Artist
Apology for the late response. They're included; not all letters and symbols are shown in the preview.
Reply
:iconynne-black:
ynne-black Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2013  Student General Artist
Thank you very much for reply :heart:
Reply
:icondylovastuff:
dylovastuff Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2013
GREAT
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2013  Professional General Artist
Thank you!
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2013
This is fun :D One question, what inspired the extra loop on top of the 'c' and the 's'? If I were using it in comic bubbles I would find it a bit distracting, depending on what letters are paired...although doesn't seem like it's all of them?
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2013  Professional General Artist
Thanks! I'm currently working on Dion Pro, which features a lot of improved characters and includes Italic, Bold, more ligatures and more numeral sets.

The extra loops you're talking about are ligatures. They're discretionary ligatures to be exact. Look at this deviation of mine to learn about the 3 different types of ligatures and their use.

The ligatures are OpenType features, so you have to turn the specific ligature type on for the loop to appear. If the OT features are turned off, you will see regular letters. I included some ligatures in the presentation to give the viewer an idea of the possibilities.
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2013
Ooooh. Someday I will have an excuse to buy it.

Thanks for the guide!

Ah, gotcha. I was wondering why they didn't show everywhere. :D
Reply
:iconyooci:
yooci Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
That's great! Thanks alot!
Reply
:iconmcflyky:
McFlyky Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The phrase "overclocked snails" leaves me both pondering and perplexed.

I pictured the flock of hypermasculine girls trampling over the inflated comic book hero.

Just the thought of that scares me.

Cool font by the way. It has a handwritten feel that I like, and would fit perfectly with comic book dialogue.
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012  Professional General Artist
'Overclocked snails' and 'non-alcoholic milk' I took from promo pictures of an other typeface. The other sentences I made up myself. I just wanted to use a lot of silly sentences because of the nature of this typeface.

Every time I look at Dion Sans I'm thinking I should eventually add italics as well. Perhaps even small-caps. For the time being though I better concentrate on typefaces I can make more money with. I wouldn't ask much for Dion Sans — if anything at all. The regular weight will always remain free for personal and commercial use though.

Thanks for your comment.
Reply
:iconovyggud:
Ovyggud Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Amazing, Can't believe i just saw this! =d
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thanks! This was more writing than designing but I did learn a lot about programming and kerning with this typeface. Because of the lack of construction and strict rules this typeface took me only 26 hours from design to kerning and programming. I wish all my typefaces would be done so fast!
Reply
:iconovyggud:
Ovyggud Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Haha it's amazing i seriously can't believe i didn't see this before, Kerning is a pain in the *** It always takes me alot of time to do finish it and i never finish it right this one is perfect though!
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Professional General Artist
I think when I finally finish one of my professional typefaces (consisting of about 12 fonts) I will hire iKern to do the spacing and kerning for me—at least for the first one. I don't trust my own skills for that at this point.
Reply
:iconovyggud:
Ovyggud Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I never knew that people get hired for kerning, phew.. type world is way to big to grasp in small amounts of time how far are you from finishing the 12 typefaces? and how long have you been working on all of them? if you don't mind me asking of course.
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Professional General Artist
I suppose you could always try to pay a professional type designer to kern your typeface, but yes, iKern does offer a service to space and kern your typeface. I don't know of any others who offer this service though. What I do know is that not all type designers do everything from design to programming. As far as I know Erik Spiekermann only draws typefaces on paper and other people do the rest, from digitizing to kerning and programming.

I think you misunderstood about the typefaces. There's a difference between a typeface and a font. A font is the file, so a single weight or style. A typeface is the font-family as it were. A typeface can consist of more than one font. I started about 26 typefaces in total but many of those only consist of a few letters and were eventually scrapped or just served as type experiments which could eventually be used as a concept for future typefaces. I have 2 typefaces released (a very limited blackletter typeface called Scaenarium Unus and later I actually learned all about typefaces and released Dion Sans) and 13 typefaces which have potential. I'm only working on 8 of those on and off. Dion Sans consists of only 1 font and I don't plan to expand the typeface at this point. Most of my typefaces will consist of about 12 fonts, meaning a range of 6 weights (Extra Light, Light, Regular, Semibold, Bold and Black) plus Italics. Small-caps are also included for most but they don't require a separate font.

The thing is though that I don't design each weight. I start with Regular and I use that to design the lightest and blackest weights in the range (usually Extra Light and Black). I would then use those 3 master weights to interpolate the in-between weights. You then only have to fix some details instead of having to draw the whole weight manually. I've never done interpolation before though. I never got that far in the design process. With Celcius I have all uppercase and lowercase in 3 weights and basic punctuation, small-caps and several sets of numbers for the Regular weight. I still have to draw all symbols and punctuation before I will do interpolation.

As for time, I spent about 130 hours on the design of Celente. I looked back at Celente a few months ago and technically it's a bad typeface. The design style is unlike any other typeface I've seen though so I might re-draw it later. Celente was my very first typeface though so I also spend a lot of time on research during my first internship. Every time I had nothing to do I would do research or work on Celente. Most type designers start with a geometric sans but starting with a serif was great for me as I learned a tremendous amount during that process. The time a typeface takes can greatly vary depending on the amount of fonts, the amount of ligatures and in general how extended you want to make the letter set. My typefaces feature an extended set with plenty of ligatures and full language support of Western languages. I don't do Cyrillic, Greek, Hebrew, Arabic or Asian languages, though I would love to do a Cyrillic in the future. For now it seems smart just to focus on the Latin set and if/when one of my typefaces becomes popular enough after its release I will expand it with Cyrillic. A sans serif typeface usually also takes a lot less time than a serif typeface because it's easier to balance out and the Italic are usually not much different from an Oblique (a regular with a slant) whereas with a serif typeface the Italic is way different from the Roman. I don't know how many hours other type designers spend on their typefaces but I suspect around 200 hours spanned over a year or two (they usually work on several typefaces at once so they can vary and not get bored with just the one). It sounds like a lot but it's quite fine. I mean, many type designers do it as their regular job so they work in a team on a single typeface for 3 months, and then there are others who do it alone and spend maybe 2 hours per day and take 2 years. I always have periods where I'm very obsessive and then don't do any type design for weeks or even months. You shouldn't rush it but take your time to slowly develop your typeface and show it to many people. By the way, the amount of time it takes to create a professional typeface also explains why you usually have to pay 100 Euro or more for a license. If you find a gap in the market with your typeface you can definitely make a lot of money with selling licenses. I believe Jos Buivenga from exljbris Font Foundry only works 2 days per week now. He had such a massive success with Museo and Calluna that the man became rich. Rather than release mediocre typefaces and offer them for free I will take my time to develop my typefaces and hope to do a massive release eventually. On the downside, I keep starting new typefaces because I get bored with older ones. That's why I should really push myself to continue work on Hagel, Celcius and Dagon again.
Reply
:iconovyggud:
Ovyggud Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I thought you were working on 12 typefaces haha, Well that's amazing people who take years to finish a single typeface is amazing, I'm not sure i can stay all this time working on just 1 typeface tbh.. but ya eventually i'll get to it , You should start on the typefaces you stopped would really love to see how the outcome will be!
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Professional General Artist
Well, that's on and off of course. I don't think these people will work on that typeface every day. That's why I say don't rush it, but it's also why I keep starting new typefaces. I get bored with a design quickly and I always have so many ideas that sometimes I just need to start something new and show people my idea. If I didn't do that though I think I would be selling two typefaces by now, and currently I could definitely use the money. Ah well...
Reply
:iconchalkcolate:
Chalkcolate Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2012
so good!
Reply
:icongabism:
Gabism Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2012
thanks! ;)
Reply
:iconcorviid:
Corviid Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
NON-alcoholic milk? No thank you. :P
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2012  Professional General Artist
What about non-lactose alcohol? ;)
Reply
:iconcorviid:
Corviid Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
even BETTER.

:drunk:
Reply
:iconsaevus:
Saevus Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012  Professional General Artist
A good looking cartoon font. Thanks for making it available.
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you. I released it 2 years ago but it never got much attention. I recently changed the name from 'KTF Dion' to 'Dion' (KTF stands for Kroon Type Library; a name I'm not going to use anymore) and did a proper promo picture in the hope it would get more attention this time.

Some of my professional and extended typefaces should be released fairly soon as well. I will probably make 1 weight per typeface available for free.
Reply
:iconburtony:
burtony Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012
clean job. Bravo :-)
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you!
Reply
:iconspazchicken:
SpazChicken Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012  Professional General Artist
Great resource, thanks!
Reply
:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012  Professional General Artist
Thank you!
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×
Download ZIP download, 155 KB




Details

Submitted on
January 2, 2012
File Size
155 KB
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
6,476 (1 today)
Favourites
80 (who?)
Comments
32
Downloads
2,049
×